Injury Prevention

The old cliché is “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This cliché holds true in running. If a runner can stay injury free, they are able to run more consistently. As a result, they are able to run better and faster in races. Most runners will have experienced an injury. I personally have experience multiple hamstring injuries, calf strains, shin splints, and achilles tendonisis. I have implemented a few exercises, and have made changes in form and footwear in order to minimize my injuries in the future.

I currently work on strength and flexibility through Yoga routines from Tara Stiles. She has beginner, intermediate, and advanced routines. I’m stuck in the beginner routines, since I’m not very flexible. She has a great beginner routine for strength and flexibility. When I am able, I try to rotate these two routines daily into my workout. Strength and flexibility or directly correlated to running injury free, and I believe these routines have helped me combat chronic achilles pain.

It is important to mind your form when running. Strengthening core and limbs can help a runner keep correct form. According to this Runner’s World article– it all starts in the hips. If the hips are up, you can have a foot strike that is underneath of you. This will ensure that the force caused by a footfall is spread out evenly. This is a key in order to prevent future injuries.

Altra footwear. Every day footwear. Correct Toes. Smash the links. The shoes/correct toes have helped me to stay injury-free. I’m not saying the shoes or the Correct Toes alone will keep you free from injury, but I submit that they have helped. The Correct Toes have allowed my toes the chance to have a natural toe splay on my run. This in turn has minimized the force on my achilles tendon and has reduced this risk of injury. Runners may never be able to fully prevent injuries. However, with strength/flexibility training and the right footwear, they may be able to minimize injuries.

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